Dog Barking and Noise Law in a Nutshell

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Dog Barking and Noise Law in a Nutshell

Staff Writer · Oct 29, 2009

You may not think about it until you are impacted by this kind of situation, but dog barking noise law is a big deal in most communities. The unfortunate mix of pet lovers and those who love their peace and quiet will often produce a local controversy over dog noise control. When you’re dealing with this kind of situation, it’s crucial to know how dog barking noise control is handled legally in your community.

About a Local Dog Barking Ordinance

A dog barking noise ordinance is a local law that gets made at the community level. In some states, counties produce their own noise ordinance laws. In other states like Pennsylvania, local government is split into townships and boroughs within a county.

In either case, a local government board presides over their jurisdiction, creating local ordinance and enforcing it through a local police department. It’s important to understand that dog noise laws and other noise ordinances are often made at a local level. In many cases, the local government has produced specific criteria for what constitutes a dog noise violation.

Knowing Your Venue

A lot of locals who are successful in getting changes to a dog noise ordinance know how to deal with their local board. Residents with dog noise issues can visit board meetings and present complaints that will be handled by the board. It can help to produce documentation in the form of an audiotape, and to research what the current guidelines are, to petition for changes to a stricter ordinance.

Often, those who have previously attended local government meetings, or those who showed greater respect for local officials, will get a better hearing on an issue like a dog noise ordinance. Staying involved is crucial to getting the local ordinance you want, and knowing how to argue your case is also a good asset. It’s important to show local public officials just how dog noise is impacting the lives of neighbors and residents. Ultimately, that local board is accountable to the taxpayers in their jurisdiction, and usually, following a series of complaints, the board will act on a dog in a situation that is negatively affecting the community.

Working Through the Local Government

The next time you encounter anything in your neighborhood that is making you lose sleep, get involved in local governments to see what you can do to get more peace and quiet in your community. Take a look at how the local newspaper covers these kinds of issues, or create a neighborhood group that would generally work with the local government to improve the community. Dog noise is only a tiny piece of what local governments and neighborhood groups deal with to improve the quality of life in their neighborhoods. You may find that you’ll stay involved in tracking legislation at a local level, and advocating for what’s good for your neighborhood.

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